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Showing posts from March, 2014

Book Review: Water Resource Management in a Vulnerable World

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Access to water is poised to be the issue future wars will be fought over, especially in the context of global climate change and its current and projected impacts. In Water Resource Management in a Vulnerable World: the hydro-hazardscapes of climate change,Daanish Mustafa, a Reader in Human Geography at King’s College, London, argues that the most pressing challenge facing us today is addressing water sufficiency while managing our increasing vulnerability to climate change. He deconstructs this crisis by examining what he terms the “hydro-hazardscapes of climate change”.


Under this ‘hydro-hazardscape’ discourse, the main argument Mustafa puts forth is that apart from looking at structural solutions such as building dams, canals, tube wells and flood banks, water managers must look at the social, economic, cultural and political pressures that impact societies. For more about the book and the variety of case studies Mustafa uses to illustrate his thesis, read a book review I did for N…

Book Review: Reclaiming Development by Ha-Joon Chang and Ilene Grabel

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Reclaiming Development was not an easy book for me to read. It made me uncomfortable in a way only a book aiming to question the status quo can. From the beginning, it grasped my attention in a bold, 'here is our argument and this is why it is important enough for you to listen to it' way. I'm glad I chose to review the book (and thankful to LSE Review of Books to send it to me!).

In simple writing and concise chapters, Chang and Grabel (both noted development economists), put forth a compelling case for challenging the current belief that development is achievable only through a neoliberal model. The book first explores existing 'Development Myths' and then provides specific solutions drawing from several case studies.

For more on the book and my review of it, you can go here.

Link Pack: Hydro-hazardscapes, waste management and mainstreaming CC adaptation

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Book: I am reading the latest book by Daanish Mustafa (Reader, Geography at King's College, London) 'Water Resource Management in a Vulnerable World: The Hydro-hazardscapes of Climate Change'. He introduces the concept of 'hydro-hazardscapes' to effectively capture the non-economic, socio-cultural values of water as well as emphasise the different constructions of threat as perceived by different stakeholders by using examples from Pakistan to USA. A review will be up shortly.    

Report:A study by the Centre for Policy and Research (CPR, India) makes a case for state-level climate change planning as a relevant entry for sustainable development process. Now we hope the people in-charge read it!

Video:Satyamev Jayate, an Indian television talk show that highlights social issues in India ranging from female infanticide and untouchability, to unsustainable pesticide use and growing water scarcity, is back for a second season. Anchored by Aamir Khan (one of Bollywood'…

PhD Tips: Second Year or Fieldwork as a Planned Adventure

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When I wrote out tips for First year PhD students, I didn't realise it would become the most viewed post on my blog (nearly 1200 views to date!). Between picking up a new job, relocating back to India, and getting used to post-PhD life (who knew I'd miss it so?!), I found myself going through notebooks I'd kept during my fieldwork. Covering 11 months of fieldwork, the notebooks reminded me of the best part of my doctoral journey, which involved asking difficult questions, travelling to the back of beyond, and sometimes, eating opium for dinner! Today, I am writing about things to keep in mind during one's fieldwork, assuming you have a clear idea about what data you want to collect and how (methods and tools you are using). As before, this post would apply to people doing primary predominantly qualitative data collection. 
Do not underestimate the pilot phase: Give adequate time to piloting your tools. I spent two months making linkages within the community, piloting my…